The origins of Palmistry!

August 20, 2008

The origins of palmistry

The origins of palmistry

The origins of Palmistry:

There are at least two palmistry traditions; Eastern and Western. A relationship between those two traditions has existed historically as well. It turns out not everyone believes that the Gypsies brought palmistry to the West.

FULL ARTICLE:
Theories and speculations about the origins of western palmistry

According to Fred Gettings (1965), the earliest reference to palmistry (palm reading) in Indian literature appears in the Vasistha, Rule 21. There, an ascetic is forbidden to earn his living by explaining omens, or by engaging in astrology and palmistry. The Ancient Code of Manu, also Vedic, upholds similar principles.Yet, in later times, palmistry became highly regarded in India. Palmistry was considered so important that the hands of gods in paintings and sanctuaries were carved with markings of lines and symbols. They were highly exaggerated, and not very similar to real-life palms.

Trade was open to the Greeks through established routes used by Arabs for centuries. What became Western palmistry traveled East. Alexander the Great, a pupil of Aristotle, is conjectured to have brought interest in the art back. Lines appeared on the palms of Greek statues of gods as well.

However nice this theory sounds, I would be remiss not to point out that Ancient Egyptians, Chaldeans, Sumerians, and Babylonians all have been credited with originating the art as well.

A few months ago I even received an email from an Independent reader in Thailand who suggested that palmistry began with Native American tribes in the US. My reader suggests that Carl Jung wrote the forward to the book by Julius Spier, The Hands of Children, and was remiss in not mentioning that Erich Neumann’s wife was an internationally know palmist. Jung took an interest in palmistry, the reader points out, and regarded Neuman highly, but didn’t in all his letters or books mention his wife reading hands.

In the Western tradition, the art evolved from basic lines, to hand shapes, to texture and markings. Medieval writings focus on the lines. By the sixteenth century, the spirit of individuality was emerging. Early Renaissance scholars were often well versed in palmistry, and markings for different kinds of patterns were devised.

The practice, still thought of as an art, was closely connected to astrology. Each finger and mound was related to a planet. It was thought a whole constellation of one’s life could be read in the thumb.

So, when you go in for the art of divining, be sure you get your money’s worth. The whole story is not told in the lines. Like the history of trauma, the history of palmistry is buried underground and often veers off course. Its development has not unfolded in a linear fashion. In England, palmistry was not pursued with the same intensity as it was elsewhere. Chiromancy was primarily associated increasingly with the gypsies. Universities did not pursue its scholarship and practice, as did institutions of higher learning on the other continents.

If the gypsies came from the Pariahs of India, as some maintain, this would mean an alternate route of dispersion of Western knowledge. Traveling from shire to shire in the 1500s, they performed all sorts of crafts to get money from the landholders; palmistry being one such craft. But a practitioner among the lower classes was considered to be either a gypsy or a witch, thus the practice of palmistry merited death according to a law that was not repealed in England until the reign of George III.

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your life purpose & your hands

Lifeprints: your life purpose & your hands

Richard Unger - hand analyst

Richard Unger - hand analyst

Lifeprints & your life purpose:

More than 25 years of research were spent developing LifePrints, the creation of Richard Unger, a world’s leading authority on Hand Analysis (palm reading – palmistry). LifePrints consists of a booklet that specifically addresses your strengths, challenges and life goals. It offers you inspiring information about your best life.

In LifePrints, hand analyst Richard Unger presents a groundbreaking method of self-discovery based on twenty-five years of research and fingerprint statistics for more than fifty thousand hands. Combining the science of dermatoglyphics (the study of fingerprints and related line and hand shape designations) with the ancient wisdom of palmistry, the LifePrints system is a simple yet profoundly accurate means of mapping one’s life purpose.

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Richard Unger presents ‘Lifeprints’

Unique, unchanging, and formed five months before birth, fingerprints have been an accepted and infallible means of personal identification for a century. In LIFEPRINTS, Richard Unger presents a groundbreaking method of self-discovery and offers a daily compass for meaning and fulfillment.

Combining the science of dermatoglyphics (the study of fingerprints and related line and hand shape designations) with the ancient wisdom of palmistry, the LifePrints system is a simple yet profoundly accurate means of mapping one’s life purpose. Like examining an acorn to know what kind of oak tree may one day emerge, reading our fingerprints reveals who we are meant to become.

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    Palmist Gary Markwich describes the future in healing hands

    Palmist Gary Markwick

    A visionary Palmist:

    As a practising Palm Reader in Camden, Gary Markwick was approached by a national newspaper last month to read a Hand Print of Democrat candidate Barack Obama, 46, during his UK visit.

    FULL ARTICLE:
    Palmist describes the future in healing hands

    “It was really interesting. I knew it was a politician and I was told afterwards that it was a very accurate reading of him,” said Mr Markwick, who has also read the palms of celebrities, including the former Eastenders actress Gillian Taylforth and the television and radio broadcaster Phill Jupitus. In his reading of Obama’s palm, he stated: “He will take on a new project that will affect his life and the lives of others in a big way. His success will reach a peak around the age of 48.”

    He added: “The Middle East is showing up here. I feel they are going to be involved with this part of the world in the future.”But palmistry is only one aspect of Mr Markwick’s grasp of the paranormal. Having studied reiki at Barnet College and wellness therapies in India, he is also a clairvoyant and holistic therapist. He believes the future of health lies in adapting psychic techniques to work alongside mainstream medicine.As an expert in reiki, he says its healing principles can be adapted within hospitals and among nurses to improve patient care and promote a greater understanding and support for those in need. The technique is said to work by channelling energy into a patient through touch to activate the natural healing process within the body. “I want to help others to help themselves,” said the 56-year-old, who has been studying the skills for more than 20 years.

    Gary Markwick admits that he always encounters sceptics, but argues his analysis and perceptions of events shows doubters there is scope for belief. “I say nothing at all to the sceptics,” he said. “I just give them the reading and look at their faces after, and their guard goes down. There is a delight in their face and a change in them. They often say ‘I didn’t believe in it but now I feel totally different,’” he added. “I am very practical. I don’t go off and try to spook them — I am trying to promote positivity in their lives through being a therapist.”

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    Palmistry in the USA

    Palmistry in the USA

    Palmistry experts in the USA:

    Palmistry and Palm Reading is quite popular in the USA. There are various professional organisations in the USA which promote Hand Analysis as a (alternative) ‘science’.

    The most common ‘Palmistry’ synonyms used in the USA are: ‘Palm Reading’, ‘Hand Reading’, and ‘Hand Analaysis’. One should also notice that the word ‘Palm Reading’ is also associated with the PDA-device developed by Palm corp.

    One of the few famous people in the history of Palmistry is the american William G. Benham, who wrote the classic: ‘The Benham book of Palmistry’ – which is sometimes described as: ‘The Bible of Palmistry’.

    Find more Palmistry experts, websites + much more info brought to you by Palmists and Palm Readers living in the USA:

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    71 Palmists

    Palmistry in USA

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    Palmistry - the length of the life line

    Palmistry - the length of the life line

    “Mr. Palmist, what’s the meaning of the length of the ‘life line’?”

    The life line is one of the most well-known features of Palmistry. Most people are able to find the life line in their own hands.

    PALMISTRY COURSE:
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    Some guidelines from the international Palmistry literature about the ‘life line’ (or ‘line of life’):

    William G. Benham writes in ‘The Benham Book of Palmistry’ (1900):

    (p. 467): “The line of Life indicates the health of the subject during the various periods of life, his physical strength in general, and whether he lives during each period on his nervous force or relies upon muscular robustness. By reason of these facts, it records many detailed events in his life, and forms a basis to fall back upon when seeking confirmations and explanations of indications found elsewhere in the hand.”

    Edward D. Campbell writes in ‘The Encyclopedia of Palmistry’ (1996):

    (p.133): “To the Indian palmists, this line reflects the strength of the family tree. Long, clear, and well-marked life lines are indicative of strength, vitality, good immune systems, good recovery ability, resilience, and sexual energy, especially if they describe a generous curve around a healthy mount of Venus.”

    Arnold Holtzman, Ph.D. writes in ‘Psychodiagnostic Chirology in Analysis and Therapy’ (2004):

    (p.116): “The tenar line: ego drive discipline. This line is identified almost universally as the line of life. And while tradition and folklore have their place in any culture this very unfortunate labeling has contributed to countless tragedies over the years. Books have been published in which the assertion was made that the length of this line is an indicator of the length of the person’s life, and many a death can be attributed to a palmist’s stated certainty that the subject would not life beyond a given year. It is imperative, then, to establish at the start that there is no link whatsoever between this line and the length of one’s life.”

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    Palmistry - which hand to read?

    Palmistry - which hand to read?

    ‘Mr. Palmist, which hand do you read?’

    Which hand does the palmist read? History shows that the answer might depend on the culture where Palmistry is being used.

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    Some recommendations from the international Palmistry literature on which hand to use for Palmistry:William G. Benham writes in ‘The Benham Book of Palmistry’ (1900):

    (p. 31): “In all examinations you should consult both hands, and should never attempt specific statements, unless they are based upon a thorough knowledge of the information which can be gleaned only from the hands considered seperately, and then together. Many failures are recorded in palm readings when one hand only has been used, due to the fact that men change as they grow older, and these changes are recorded in the right hand.”

    Edward D. Campbell writes in ‘The Encyclopedia of Palmistry’ (1996):

    (p.20): “I no longer follow any traditional method of looking at the right and left hand. I believe that those Eastern methods that look only to the right hand for male clients and the left hand for females are totally inadequate and sexist, and often are value-based against the left hand. This bias against the left hand has crept into Western Palmistry just as the latin word for left, sinister, has coloured our thoughts concerning left-handed persons as conniving, bad people.”

    Arnold Holtzman, Ph.D. writes in ‘Psychodiagnostic Chirology in Analysis and Therapy’ (2004):

    (p.63): “As for the hands themselves, no two are exactly alike – not even when they belong to the same person. The question that arises must be: if each hand is unique, delivering a ‘story’ which must, in some way, be different from every other ‘story’, which hand and which ‘story’ is the most representative of the individual? Which may we assume to be the truest mirror of his, or her, immediate circumstances? The answer is both – equally. Each hand may put forward its own account of the man it speaks of, and each would be entirely relevant.”

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    Palmistry - the marriage lines

    Palmistry - the marriage lines

    ‘Mr. Palmist, what does my marriage line say?’

    The marriage line is – next to the life line & and the heart line – one of the most popular hand line features in Palmistry. Nevertheless, the palmistry literature shows a debate the reliability of this line.

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    Some guidelines from the international Palmistry literature about the marriage line (a.k.a. ‘union lines’, ‘affection lines’ or ‘relationship lines’):William G. Benham writes in ‘The Benham Book of Palmistry’ (1900):

    (p. 520): “In some hands there are none of these lines and in others many are seen. From time immemorial they have been used by older palmists as indications of marriage or unions of the sexes. Their value in practice is considerable if used up to their limit, and in combination, but used by themselves, as a hard-and-fast indication of marriage, they lead to contstant error.”

    David Brandon-Jones writes in ‘Practical Palmistry’ (1986):

    (p.241): “They are also known as lines of Marriage or Affection and are connected with the individual”s capacity for giving and receiving affection. A relationship line may or may not refer to husband, wife or lover. To my certain knowledge, it has, in at least one case, indicated a lonely lady’s fondness for a beloved pet. It is not possible, as I know to my cost, to rely on these lines alone as predicting marriage or the start of a long-term relationship.”

    Nathaniel Altman, writes in ‘Sexual Palmistry’ (1986):

    (p.120): “Unfortunately there is no certain sign of age on a union line, as it length can also reveal the lingering impact of a relationship on the person even after it is ‘officially’ over. Again, the intuition can be usefull here. Major issues involving incompatibility, personality conflicts, lack of commitment and infidelity are often reflected in islands or breaks. Whenever you study a union line, remember that it is subject to change.”

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    Palm reading goes medical

    August 16, 2008

    Palmistry - the length of the life line

    Palmistry goes medical

     

     

    Space scientist talks about Palm Reading

    Kumar, 42, is a scientist at the Indian Space Research Organization in Bangalore, India. Twelve years ago, a palm reader told him by looking at the palm of his hand that he would become a palm reader himself.

    FULL ARTICLE:
    Palm reading goes medical

    It was a prediction that really embarrassed Kumar, he said in an e-mail, but that ended up igniting his interest in palm reading reading. He spent years reading books and learning about this science and ended up opening his own practice.There, Kumar said, he observed many hands and was able to detect similarities in the palm linese of people living with certain type of diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease. This led to his visit to the Regional Cancer Center where he studied the palm lines of about 160 patients with cancer. According to Kumar’s observations, most of them had the same lines.”It made me think of another matter”, said Kumar. “If this disease is detected in the primary stage itself, it is quite curable. Then why can’t we get precaution against this fatal disease through finding the palm line symptoms? Really, this notion opened before me the endless and eventful vista of medical palm reading.”

    Medical Palm Reading around the world

    The general definition of palm reading is the study of the hand lines to predict the future, assess personalities and provide counseling. Medical palm reading on the other hand, looks at the hand’s lines, shape and texture to detect abnormalities that will help diagnose physical and mental diseases.

    For centuries, Chinese and Indian medicine has recognized the link between palmistry and good health. Abnormalities such as vertical ridges on the fingernails, or a life line that’s faint in color, can represent a diagnosis for all sorts of illnesses from intestinal problems to heart disease. The Catholic Church, for its part, has always branded palm reading as devil worship and forced it underground.

    So far however, this science is still far from being accepted in the West. According to Kenneth Lagerstrom, a professional palmist and founder of a website on the human hand, in North America “the palms of the hands are sometimes called ‘no man’s land’ because it’s expected that no self-respecting medical professional will deal with palmistry.”

    Another reason for the West’s reluctance to recognize medical palm reading as a reliable diagnosis tool is the lack of belief in what is considered by many here as an “occult science,” Lagerstrom said. In addition, he blames his fellow practitioners themselves for all the uncertainties still surrounding medical palm reading.

    “In my opinion,” he said, “more than 95 percent of them are either dangerously incompetent or outright fraudulent. Very few seek details that can be scientifically or medically verified, preferring instead to make their readings either fortune-telling or ‘spiritual.’”

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    The history of Palmistry

    August 16, 2008

    The history of Palmistry

    The history of Palmistry

    From gypsies to modern science:

    Long ago gypsies used palmistry as “a crafty means to deceive people”. But nowadays acedemic science shows an interest for the work of modern Palmists.

    FULL ARTICLE:
    The history of palmistry

    Speculation existed that the gypsy fortune tellers prevalent in England had come from Egypt. But practice in Egypt had long ago died out by the time the gypsies arrived in Europe. In high social circles in India, however, the art was still popular and thriving.Yet the official British attitude towards palmistry expressed in a statute of Henry VIII in 1530 was that it was “a crafty means to deceive people.” Such an attitude was not found on the continent. Furthermore, there was already a written chiromantic tradition 200 years before the gypsies arrived.Eventually, the British began to rescue the art from the gypsy veneer, which was thought to spoil the practice.

    New books on palmistry began to appear in England in 1652, such as George Wharton’s The Art of Divining by the Lines and Signature Ingraven on the Hand of Man. These books appeared during the so-called “golden age” of the pseudo-sciences in England; supported by Thomas Hyll’s publication of a book on palmistry in 1613.

    Hyll was able to support himself as a “miscellaneous” writer, working on translations for publishers and on compilations. But he also was a very enlightened Jack of all trades whose interest in palmistry, astrology, and the like showed through in his publications — which flourished between 1550 and 1599.

    Alchemical research was also on the rise at this time. All sorts of arts were being rescued from where they had been buried during the Dark Ages. But chirology (a scientific approach) began to replace chiromancy. The latter was more intuitive. Chirology set the tone for rationalization of the art during the Enlightenment. And guess what? (This should come to no surprise to those familiar with the history of women in Western civilization); as medical doctors ousted the female midwives, the scientific rationalists gradually usurped the female gypsy fortune tellers from society.

    The palmists portrayed in Italian paintings of gypsy chiromancers during the 16th century were women, delicately holding the hands of male clients. Go see an engraving by Benoit Audran and Caravaggio’s The Gypsy Fortune Teller the next time you are in the vicinity of the Louvre.

    Gradually, these visual images were replaced by portraits of distinguished-looking gentlemen bearing books, such as that of Richard Sanders in his text, Physiognomie, And Chiromacie, Metoposcopie.

    The man in the portrait holds a book. He stands between a British family seal and a window to the outside world. Beside him is a globe situated behind a table with various instruments suggesting scientific procedure.

    But his books are readable, which helped to re-popularize the arts. His love of more occult sciences — like divination by nails reflecting sunrays (onychomancy), divination by the flight of birds (orniscopy), and divination by wine (oinomancy) — remained in the picture as he disclosed the secrets of palmistry.

    Sanders later became an advocate of the interpretation of signs on the various mounds of the palms, combined with alchemical and astrological references. Both Hebrew and Latin are used on the front of the above-mentioned book.

    Palmistry was thus rescued from the lower classes — from foreigners and from women — for the benefit of titillation of the British upper class.

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    Palmistry psychology

     

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