9 LINES & 9 DISORDERS:
WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

In order to avoid misunderstandings, a brief description of each of the 9 hand lines in the picture, is given below:

Line 1 = extra crease on the distal phalange (beyond the distal interphalangeal crease)
Line 2 = extra crease on the middle phalange (in 1 or more fingers)
Line 3 = single crease on the pinky finger
Line 4 = extra crease on the thumb
Line 5 = ‘hockey-stick crease’
Line 6 = simian crease
Line 7 = Sydney crease
Line 8 = transverse hypothenar crease
Line 9 = secondary creases: unusually high density

The names of the 9 disorders are:

A = Alagille syndrome (= genetic disorder related to e.g. the liver, heart & kidney)
B = Coffin-Lowry syndrome (= genetic disorder: e.g. mental problems, health)
C = Down syndrome (= genetic disorder: trisomy 21, e.g. mental handicap, health)
F = Edward syndrome (= genetic disorder: trisomy 18, e.g. low rate of survival)
D = Fetal alcohol syndrome (= caused by alcohol abuse during pregnancy)
E = Fragile-X syndrome (= genetic disorder: Xq27, e.g. mental handicap, autism)
G = Pit-Rogers-Dank syndrome (= e.g. growth disorder, mental retardation)
H = Schizophrenia (= psychiatric disorder)
I = Sickle Cell Diseases (= blood disorder)

The QUIZ-task is very simple:
‘Which line (in the picture above) belongs to which disorder?’

(You can submit your answers as a response to this blog post, but you can also discuss the details at the Modern Hand Reading Forum, at:   The ‘Weird-Hand-Lines QUIZ’ – part 2)

By the way, quite a few ”clues’ for finding the right connections are provided in the section MEDICAL HAND ANALYSIS.

9 LINES & 9 NAMES:
WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

The names of the 9 hand lines (most of them are quite frequently mentioned in the palmistry literature) are:

A = Buddha line (first described by Japanese palmist: Hachiro Asano)
B = Equipoise line* (first described by PDC chirologist: Arnold Holtzman)
C = Girdle of Venus (e.g. described by Australian hand reader: Andrew Fitzherbert)
D = Healing stigmata (e.g. described by US hand reader: William G. Benham)
E = Intuition line (e.g. described by US palmist: Nathaniel Altman)
F = Passion line (first described by UK chirologist: Johnny Fincham)
G = Poorva Punya (e.g. described by Canadian palmist: Ghanshyam Singh Birla)
H = Ring of Solomon (e.g. described by the Irish palmist: Cheiro)
I = Via Lascivia (e.g. described by US hand analyst Edward D. Campbell)

 

The palmistry QUIZ-task is quite simple:
‘Which hand line (in the picture above) belongs to which name?’

(You can submit your answers as a response to this blog post, but you can also discuss the details at the Modern Palmistry Forum, at:     The ‘Weird-Hand-Lines QUIZ’ – part 1)

The Books that were presented by the palm reading & palmistry experts mentioned behind the 9 names of the hand lines are all listed in the:
Palmistry books TOP 100 – listed by ‘Amazon Sales Rank’

MODERN PALMISTRY - The New International Community for Reading Hands![tweetmeme source=”handresearch” only_single=false] Are you interested to learn more about your hands? Or would you like to see and hear what kind of feedback other receive about their hands? You can now start enjoying the discussions – and after joining you can even ask questions & participate in the early developments of this brand new forum focussed on Modern Palmistry & Palm Reading! You can ask your question at: 

 Modern Palmistry – the new forum at forumotion.com!

 

The Modern Palmistry forum offers:

– Free assistance provided by some of the very experienced Palmistry, Hand Analysis & Cheirology experts in the world!
– Various Madame Tussauds ‘hand casts’ of famous people!

For example, you can also take a look at some ‘famous hands’:

• Hand casts of the ‘Spice Girls’
• Hand cast of Michael Jackson
• Hand cast of Robin Williams

PS. NOTICE: You can also decide take a look into the forum without joining; but you would like to start participating… please feel free to join!!!

Your Life is in your hands!

THE FULL STORY:
THE HAND LINES & PALMAR CREASES

[tweetmeme source=”handresearch” only_single=false] Last month VoiceAmerica’s radioshow “Your Life is in Your Hands” presented an episode devoted to the palmar creases of the hand. UK hand analyst Lynn Seal was invited to talk with host Kenneth Lagerström about the mysterious ‘lines of the hands’.

During the hour various aspects of the hand lines were discussed, including: the mystery of the ‘palmar flexion creases’, the prenatal development of the (major) hand lines in the early life of the embryo, line variations among ethnic populations, the differences between hand lines in the left and right hand, and how the hand lines can be used for different purposes in palmistry. Lynn explained very well that in time the hand lines can show significant changes; this simple fact might explain why the validity of ‘future predictions based on the hand lines’ are even disputed from within the palmistry community!

Unfortunately the podcast of the show is nog longer available, but Kenneth has pointed out that the recording will become available at HumandHand.com in the near future.

How to understand the major characteristics of the lines in the palm of your hands properly?

In modern palm reading (cheirology) the hand lines are not used for predicting the future; contrary the hand lines are recognized as ‘energy flows’ reflecting process in the body and the brain which related the various aspects of an indvidual, including temperament, personality & and interpersonal functioning.
Palmistry: the major hand lines & palmar creases.

HAND LINES IN THE HAND OF AN EMBRYO

Contrary to what many believe, the development of the hand lines does not directly relate to the movements of the hands. For example, the three major hand lines (life line, heart line and head line), start developing in the hand of the little embryo in the 2nd month of gestation – while the first hand movements do not occure before the 2nd half of the third month.

Another indication is provided by the fact that usually the ‘passive’ hand (= left hand for righthanded people) shows more hand lines then the ‘active hand’ (= right hand for righthanded people). And often the hands of people who are active in jobs that require a lot of manual work, show less palmar lines than those who are active in jobs that are not featured with the use of the hands (such as social work).

After about 7 weeks the life line starts developing in the hand of the embryo.
The hand of a 7 week old embryo.The hand of a 7 week old embryo after 48 days.

WHAT DO THE HAND LINES REVEAL?

Despite the fact that many palmists around the world – especially in Asia – still claim that the lines in the palm or our hands reveal information about our future, the truth is that within the global palm reading community there appears to be a growing number of debaters who actually question the validity of this claim.

While traditional palmistry has merely been a matter of using the hand as an occult ‘tool’ – focussed on making (future) ‘prediction’; in the 20th century modern palm reading became more focussed on the issue of understanding human nature, by studying the psychological- & spiritual life of individuals.

The most frequently asked question is probably: “what do my hand lines reveal?” Interestinly, the answer might actually depend on the person who is faced with this question! For example, a traditional palmist might point to your future, a modern palm reader might point of your brain, and a scientific hand analyst … might point to your genes!

14 Palmar creases: an overview of the most common hand lines.
Palmar creases: an overview of the most common hand lines.
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING:
What does the presence of a ‘simian line’ reveal?
The story of the ‘Sydney line’: how it relates to the ‘simian line’!

28 Characteristics of the hand in Fragile X syndrome (Xq27).

How to recognize the hand in Fragile X syndrome?

Alexander Rodewald presented in 1986 the very first ‘phantom picture’ describing the typical hand characteristics in Fragile X syndrome (e.g. including the simian crease or Sydney line). But more detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were never presented after the A. Rodewald et al. (1986) publication. However, this month (february 2010) an updated ‘phantom picture’ has become available – featuring 28 characteristics of the hand in Fragile X syndrome (+ a couple of other hand related characteristics).

What are typical hand characteristics in Fragile X syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of a Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the fingerprints of the 3rd finger (and the 2nd + 4th finger); often these demonstrate the presence of ‘radial loop’ patterns and/or arch patterns (the normal ‘ulnar loop’ patterns are less common in Fragile X syndrome) – combined with a ‘transverse’ pattern in the palmar ridge lines in the distal palmar zone.

HAND SHAPE:
The palm width (hand breadth) is relatively broad, and the palm length is usually a bit short. Finger length is relatively long compared to the palm length, but slightly short compared to the palm breadth.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Fragile X syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in most cases of Fragile X syndrome certain combinations of the 28 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

More details available at:
How to use the ‘simian crease’ for recognizing Fragile X syndrome?

Photo: the hand of a baby hand with hyperextensible finger joints – often seen in Fragile X syndrome.
Hand of a baby hand with hyperextensible finger joints - often seen in fragile x syndrome.

What is Palmistry? - Palmistry 2010: a redefinition!

PALMISTRY 2010: What is Palmistry today?

In the early days palmistry was merely used as a ‘divination’ tool. But times have changed and so did the applications of palmistry!

Especially in Western countries the activities of the modern palmist should no longer associated with the early applications of future predictions & fortune readings. But nevertheless, today on the internet definitions of palmistry (palm reading) often merely relate to the aspect of ‘divination’. Time to present a redefinition of palmistry!

What is Palmistry in 2010?

“Palmistry is the practice (or art) of studying the hands, usually with the intent focussed on one (or more) of the following four aspects of life:

1 – health consultation, 2 – character interpretation, 3 – life purpose orientation, 4 – divination”

More details concerning each of the four types of palmistry is available here:
The basic principle of Palmistry & Palm Reading!

DERMATOGLYPHICS: An introduction to the dermatoglyphs of the human hand.

Dermatoglyphics – News, reports & research!

The word ‘dermatoglyphics‘ was introduced in 1926 by Harold Cummins – the word refers directly to the study of the patterns & characteristics of the skin ridges in the human hand (and foot). What are the basic characteristics of the dermatoglyphics in the human hand?

FINGERPRINT DERMATOGLYPHICS:

In most populations around the world is the ‘ulnar loop’ the most observed fingerprint pattern (see: the fingerprint of the pinky finger in the picture above). Loops are most frequently found on the little finger (and middle finger); loops are least frequently found on the pointer finger.
In some Asian populations the ‘whorl’ (see: the fingerprint of the ring finger in the picture above) is more common than the ‘ulnar loop’. Whorls are more often seen on the thumb and ring finger.
In population research usually the pointer finger demonstrates more variation than the the other fingers. For example the most common ‘ulnar loop’ is least often seen on the pointer finger, which often exhibits an other pattern such as: the ‘arch’, ‘tented arch’, ‘whorl’ or ‘radial loop’ (see: the pointer finger in the picture above).

PALMAR DERMATOGLYPHICS:

The variations in the dermatoglyphics of the handpalm are much more complex than the variations in the fingerprints. An important element concerns the presence of the ‘palmar triradii’ (see: a, b, c, d, and t in the picture above): normally each finger is featured with a palmar triradius – triradius t belongs to the thumb (the thumb mouse – a.k.a. as the ‘thenar’, or in palmistry: ‘mount of Venus’ could be recognized as the third phalange of the thumb).
However, the number of palmar triradii varies with the presence of palmar ‘loops’ (or: palmar ‘whorls’). Usually the link between the number of fingers (D = digits), palmar triradii (T) and palmar loops (L) can be described with the following formula, which is known as the Penrose topological formula (Lionel Penrose, 1965):

T = L + D – 1

More details available via:
The function of the fingerprints & dermatoglyphics in the human hand!

Picture: example of the most common patterns in the dermatoglypics of the palm and fingers.

[NOTICE: The picture below includes a small mistake: the hand palm usually has 1 single palmar ‘loop’ featured with 5 palmar triradii – this implicate that ‘c-line’ (which starts in the triradius below the ring finger) should have ended between the pinky finger and the end of the heart line – and not between the ring finger and middle finger as indicated by the picture]

Palmar & fingerprint dermatoglyphics.

How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome - 27 characteristics.

How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome?

Lionel Sharples Penrose introduced in 1963 in the magazine Nature the first ‘phantom picture’ for the hand in Down syndrome. The picture described some of the typical characteristics of the hand in Down syndrome – including the ‘simian crease’. Later more detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were presented by Schaumann & Alter (1976), and Rodewald (1981).

In januari 2010 a more detailed version became available – describing 27 characteristics of the hand in Down’s syndrome!

What are the most typical hand characteristics in Down’s syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of another unusual hand line: the Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the hypothenar zone of the hand (in palmistry a.k.a. ‘mount of moon’); usually this zone a large ‘ulnar loop’ pattern combined with a high positioned palmar axial triradius.

HAND SHAPE:
Short fingers (thumb and pinky finger are often abnormally short) + a square shaped palm.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Down syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in all cases of Down syndrome certain combinations of the 27 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

A presentation of all details is available at:
How to use the simian line + 26 other characteristics as a hand marker in Down’s syndrome!

Photo: example of the hand in a Down syndrome baby

Example of a baby hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

Clubbing in the fingers of a 33-year old female with pulmonary hypertension.
Clubbing in the fingers of a 33-year old female with pulmonary hypertension.

Nail clubbing is found in 29% of lung cancer patients!

‘Fingernail clubbing’ is one of most well-know indicators for recognizing cancer in the hand. A.k.a. ‘Hippocratic nail’ this nail characteristic been known since the early days of the Greek philosopher Hippocrates, who recognized nail clubbing as a classic sign of disease.

Today ‘nail clubbing’ is associated various lung diseases, especially lung cancer with non–small cell lung carcinoma. Nail clubbing is also linked with heart problems and gastrointestinal problems – but these are less common than lung problems.

Statistics on nail clubbing & lung cancer:

“Nail clubbing has been reported in 29% of patients with lung cancer and is observed more commonly in patients with non–small cell lung carcinoma (35%) than in patients with small cell lung carcinoma (4%).”

How to recognize ‘clubbing fingernails’?

Clubbing is usually a painless but complex fingernail disorder which often goes unnoticed of it’s presence in the hands of patients!

In individuals without clubbing, if two opposing fingers are placed together, a diamond-shaped window will appear. In clubbing, this window is obliterated and the distal angle formed by the two nails becomes wider. This is known as Schamroth sign window test.

Schamroth's windows test is used in the diagnosis of nail clubbing.

NOTICE: Cases of ‘brachydactyly’ should NOT be associated with the medical problems related to ‘nail clubbing’; the ‘clubbed thumb’ is likely the most well-known variant of ‘brachydactyly’ – which is e.g. seen in the hands of the american actress Megan Fox

Actress Megan Fox has a ‘clubbed thumb’ – which should not be confused with ‘nail clubbing’.
American actress Megan Fox has a 'clubbed thumb' - which should NOT be associated with 'nail clubbing'.

SUGGESTION FOR FURTHER READING:

Nail clubbing: developments, treatment & prevention!
Hands on lung cancer: the clubbing fingernail!
Fingernail disorders & medical hand analysis!
Overview of more common nail disorders!
Megan Fox has a ‘clubbed thumb’ – not to be confused with ‘fingernail clubbing’!!

Example of a 'Moon whorl' on the palmar hypothenar zone.

The ‘Moon whorl’ a common characteristic in Down syndrome & schizophrenia

The ‘whorl on the mount of Moon’ (a.k.a. the ‘hypothenar whorl’) is known as one of the mysterious characteristics that can only sometimes be found in the human hand. In 1943 Cummins & Midlo reported in their famous ‘Finger Prints, Palms & Soles’ statistics for a sample of 1281 German males. They found the ‘true whorl’ on the hypothenar in only 0.7% of right hands and 0.5% of left hands!

What do we know about the ‘Moon whorl’?

A few quote from the original article:

“While the classic palmistry literature describes that the ‘hypothenar whorl’ (a.k.a. ‘whorl on mount of Moon’) can be recognized as a sign for finding a ‘highly imaginative person’, various scientific studies have indicated that dermatoglyphic whorls on the mount of moon are linked with Down’s syndrome + a few other medical problems.”

NEW RESEARCH FINDING ON AUTISM!

Another quote from the article:

“A study on the hands of 30 people with autism (25 men, 5 women) revealed a surprizing high percentage of a specific (very rare) variant of the ‘hypothenar whorl’ – the ‘hypothenar composite whorl’.”

Some examples of the ‘hypothenar composite whorl’ are presented below.
3 Examples of a variant of the 'hypothenar whorl': the 'hypothenar composite whorl'.

In the perspective of the fact that in the science of fingerprints the ‘composite whorl’ is related to the ‘double loop’, it is interesting to notice here that the new finding appears to confirm an earlier reported finding which pointed out that the hands of people with autism are often featured with a ‘double loop’ in the fingerprint of the pinky finger and the presence of 2 palmar loops below that 5th finger.

In cases you’re interested to learn more about the basics of fingerprint classification – the illustration below describes the 8 most common types of fingerprints (including: 2 ‘arch’ variants, 2 ‘loop’ variants, and 4 ‘whorl’ variants).

SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING:

How fingerprinting works!
Forensic experts say: ‘fingerprints reveal more’!
A historical review of research on dermatoglyphics!

PICTURE: In the science of fingerprints ‘whorls’ is known a one of the 3 basic patterns (next to ‘loops’ and ‘arches’) – about 75% of people have at least 1 fingerprint whorl!
The whorl is known as one of the 3 most common fingerprint patterns.