28 Characteristics of the hand in Fragile X syndrome (Xq27).

How to recognize the hand in Fragile X syndrome?

Alexander Rodewald presented in 1986 the very first ‘phantom picture’ describing the typical hand characteristics in Fragile X syndrome (e.g. including the simian crease or Sydney line). But more detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were never presented after the A. Rodewald et al. (1986) publication. However, this month (february 2010) an updated ‘phantom picture’ has become available – featuring 28 characteristics of the hand in Fragile X syndrome (+ a couple of other hand related characteristics).

What are typical hand characteristics in Fragile X syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of a Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the fingerprints of the 3rd finger (and the 2nd + 4th finger); often these demonstrate the presence of ‘radial loop’ patterns and/or arch patterns (the normal ‘ulnar loop’ patterns are less common in Fragile X syndrome) – combined with a ‘transverse’ pattern in the palmar ridge lines in the distal palmar zone.

HAND SHAPE:
The palm width (hand breadth) is relatively broad, and the palm length is usually a bit short. Finger length is relatively long compared to the palm length, but slightly short compared to the palm breadth.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Fragile X syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in most cases of Fragile X syndrome certain combinations of the 28 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

More details available at:
How to use the ‘simian crease’ for recognizing Fragile X syndrome?

Photo: the hand of a baby hand with hyperextensible finger joints – often seen in Fragile X syndrome.
Hand of a baby hand with hyperextensible finger joints - often seen in fragile x syndrome.

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DERMATOGLYPHICS: An introduction to the dermatoglyphs of the human hand.

Dermatoglyphics – News, reports & research!

The word ‘dermatoglyphics‘ was introduced in 1926 by Harold Cummins – the word refers directly to the study of the patterns & characteristics of the skin ridges in the human hand (and foot). What are the basic characteristics of the dermatoglyphics in the human hand?

FINGERPRINT DERMATOGLYPHICS:

In most populations around the world is the ‘ulnar loop’ the most observed fingerprint pattern (see: the fingerprint of the pinky finger in the picture above). Loops are most frequently found on the little finger (and middle finger); loops are least frequently found on the pointer finger.
In some Asian populations the ‘whorl’ (see: the fingerprint of the ring finger in the picture above) is more common than the ‘ulnar loop’. Whorls are more often seen on the thumb and ring finger.
In population research usually the pointer finger demonstrates more variation than the the other fingers. For example the most common ‘ulnar loop’ is least often seen on the pointer finger, which often exhibits an other pattern such as: the ‘arch’, ‘tented arch’, ‘whorl’ or ‘radial loop’ (see: the pointer finger in the picture above).

PALMAR DERMATOGLYPHICS:

The variations in the dermatoglyphics of the handpalm are much more complex than the variations in the fingerprints. An important element concerns the presence of the ‘palmar triradii’ (see: a, b, c, d, and t in the picture above): normally each finger is featured with a palmar triradius – triradius t belongs to the thumb (the thumb mouse – a.k.a. as the ‘thenar’, or in palmistry: ‘mount of Venus’ could be recognized as the third phalange of the thumb).
However, the number of palmar triradii varies with the presence of palmar ‘loops’ (or: palmar ‘whorls’). Usually the link between the number of fingers (D = digits), palmar triradii (T) and palmar loops (L) can be described with the following formula, which is known as the Penrose topological formula (Lionel Penrose, 1965):

T = L + D – 1

More details available via:
The function of the fingerprints & dermatoglyphics in the human hand!

Picture: example of the most common patterns in the dermatoglypics of the palm and fingers.

[NOTICE: The picture below includes a small mistake: the hand palm usually has 1 single palmar ‘loop’ featured with 5 palmar triradii – this implicate that ‘c-line’ (which starts in the triradius below the ring finger) should have ended between the pinky finger and the end of the heart line – and not between the ring finger and middle finger as indicated by the picture]

Palmar & fingerprint dermatoglyphics.

How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome - 27 characteristics.

How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome?

Lionel Sharples Penrose introduced in 1963 in the magazine Nature the first ‘phantom picture’ for the hand in Down syndrome. The picture described some of the typical characteristics of the hand in Down syndrome – including the ‘simian crease’. Later more detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were presented by Schaumann & Alter (1976), and Rodewald (1981).

In januari 2010 a more detailed version became available – describing 27 characteristics of the hand in Down’s syndrome!

What are the most typical hand characteristics in Down’s syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of another unusual hand line: the Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the hypothenar zone of the hand (in palmistry a.k.a. ‘mount of moon’); usually this zone a large ‘ulnar loop’ pattern combined with a high positioned palmar axial triradius.

HAND SHAPE:
Short fingers (thumb and pinky finger are often abnormally short) + a square shaped palm.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Down syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in all cases of Down syndrome certain combinations of the 27 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

A presentation of all details is available at:
How to use the simian line + 26 other characteristics as a hand marker in Down’s syndrome!

Photo: example of the hand in a Down syndrome baby

Example of a baby hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

Hand analysis: hands & science.

Scientific hand analysis mini-course:
palmistry course on the basis of scientific facts!

A 33 pages hand analysis course about how diseases, syndromes and psychological problems manifest in the features of the human hand.

What can you expect from this online mini-course ‘Scientific Hand Analysis’? – A unique palmistry course:

MEDICAL HANDANALYSIS:

Why is Down’s syndrome often featured with a ‘simian crease‘ or a Sydney line? About diseases, syndromes and hand characteristics.

PSYCHIATRY & HAND ANALYSIS:

What are common hand features in schizophrenia? About the link between the brain, dermatoglyphics, and other hand features.

PSYCHOLOGY & HANDANALYSIS:

About hand features that related to developmental problems, personality characteristics, and low intelligence.

Palm reading: scientific hand analysis course.

OTHER RELATED SUGGESTIONS:
Scientific palmistry course
Males and females: the major hand differences
Handanalyse.startpagina.nl: Dutch palmistry search page
Medical palm reading: about the nails, dermatoglyphics, palmar lines and the fingers

Dermatoglyphic skin ridges: a whorl fingerprint.

Dermatoglyphic skin ridges: a whorl fingerprint.

Discover 20 facts about: skin, fingerprints & dermatoglyphics:

Discover Magazine has recently presented a list of 20 remarkable features of the skin of your hand & fingerprints. Palm reading basics about the body’s largest organ, dermatoglyphics, skin features and technology.

Including facts about: sweat, dermatoglyphic patterns, skin cells, skin receptors, skin pigment & skin technology.

MORE ABOUT SKIN & FINGERPRINTS:

Two basic functions of your fingerprints: ‘finger grip’ & ‘touch filter’
Skin facts about the human hand: fingerprints & dermatoglyphics
Understanding our past: the human hand vs. the primate hand
Fingerprints reveal identity, drugs & lifestyle
The fingerprints of Elvis Presley



Puerto Píritu
Odette Dumas - Chirologist in Venezuela
Odette
Dumas

Chirologist Odette Dumas reads hands in Venezuela, South America.

Expertises:
Chirology & hand reading; author of a chirology book (in French language).

FULL PROFILE:
Chirologist Odette Dumas

Chirology & dermatoglyphics

Chirologist Odette Dumas has developed a method using colors to illustrate the paths of the dermatoglyphics: see the picture above, taken from the website of one her (former) students: Gerald Gagnon.

Since 2008 Odette Dumas is living in Puerto Píritu, Venezuela – she used to live in Canada.

Hand reader Odette Dumas is also the author of chirology book:

  • La main, reflet de soi, reflet de l’infini (1987) – published under the name: Odette Poisson
  • Find more hand reading experts in South-America:
    Quiromancia & Leer Mano en América del Sur

    Psychodiagnostic chirology is a milestone in the history of modern hand reading!

    Psychodiagnostic chirology is a milestone in the history of modern hand reading!

    What is psychodiagnostic chirology?

    Founder Arnold Holtzman from Yehud (Israel) describes this advanced system of hand analysis as : ‘The Science of Handreading in Psychological Diagnosis’.

    In 1983 Holtzman presented his first book ‘Applied Handreading’, and in 2004 he presented his masterpiece: ‘The Illustrated Textbook of Psychodiagnostic Chirology in Analysis and Therapy’.

    Psychodiagnostich Chirology (PDC) is described by Holtzman in his second book as follows:

    “From its somewhat esoteric origins in the medical-genetic science of dermatoglyphics, Psychodiagnostic Chirology (PDC) has evolved to become one of the most powerful and dramatic tools available to professional therapists in the behavioral sciences today.”

    Interestingly, Holtzman has positioned PDC in line with the theoretical conceptualizations and clinical orientation described by various famous 20th century figures in the history of modern psychology, like for example: Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) and Abraham Maslow (1908-1970).

    The picture below describes the theoretic framework which is described in PDC of the human hand. The model includes two polar dimensions which are very related to the Psychoanalysis described by Freud (‘CONSCIOUS vs. SUBCONSCIOUS’ and ‘MIND vs. BODY’).

    The Psychodiagnostic Chirology model of the human hand.

    READ FURTHER ABOUT OTHER ASPECTS OF CHIROLOGY:
    Cheirology news from Africa
    Reviews of Holtzman’s work
    Chirology research & psychology
    Find a chirologist in Israel
    The hands of famous people

    Hand analyst Ed Campbell.

    Hand analyst Ed Campbell

    Fingerprints & palmistry:

    Hand analyst Ed Campbell present on his website Fingerprints & Palmar Dermatoglyphics: a comprehensive article about the basics of fingerprint analysis + a detailed analysis of the historic palmistry literature.
    The article includes the following:

  • The history of fingerprints, palmistry and character identity
  • What psychological characteristics are related to the fingerprints according palmists?
  • Ed Campbell’s fingerprint studies and observations
  • The physical dermatoglyphic development of fingerprints
  • Dermatoglyphic studies in health and psychology
  • (Edward Campbell’s article includes a list of 151 sources!)

    Palmar dermatoglyphics.

    Palmar dermatoglyphics

    your life purpose & your hands

    Lifeprints: your life purpose & your hands

    Richard Unger - hand analyst

    Richard Unger - hand analyst

    Lifeprints & your life purpose:

    More than 25 years of research were spent developing LifePrints, the creation of Richard Unger, a world’s leading authority on Hand Analysis (palm reading – palmistry). LifePrints consists of a booklet that specifically addresses your strengths, challenges and life goals. It offers you inspiring information about your best life.

    In LifePrints, hand analyst Richard Unger presents a groundbreaking method of self-discovery based on twenty-five years of research and fingerprint statistics for more than fifty thousand hands. Combining the science of dermatoglyphics (the study of fingerprints and related line and hand shape designations) with the ancient wisdom of palmistry, the LifePrints system is a simple yet profoundly accurate means of mapping one’s life purpose.

    FULL ARTICLE:
    Richard Unger presents ‘Lifeprints’

    Unique, unchanging, and formed five months before birth, fingerprints have been an accepted and infallible means of personal identification for a century. In LIFEPRINTS, Richard Unger presents a groundbreaking method of self-discovery and offers a daily compass for meaning and fulfillment.

    Combining the science of dermatoglyphics (the study of fingerprints and related line and hand shape designations) with the ancient wisdom of palmistry, the LifePrints system is a simple yet profoundly accurate means of mapping one’s life purpose. Like examining an acorn to know what kind of oak tree may one day emerge, reading our fingerprints reveals who we are meant to become.

  • A guide to discovering one’s life purpose by decoding the map revealed in our unique combination of fingerprints.
  • This new system is based on the author’s 25 years of research and fingerprint statistics for more than 52,000 hands.
  • Features step-by-step instructions for identifying the fingerprints and mapping the life lessons for reaching our full potential.
  • Includes detailed case studies plus fingerprint readings for Albert Einstein, John F. Kennedy, Amelia Earhart, Walt Disney, Susan B. Anthony, Martin Luther King, Charles Manson, and others.
  • Search by Topic HAND NEWS:
    Palm Therapy | Hand Gestures | Digit Ratio
    Fingernails | Fingerprints | Hand Analysis

    Fingerprint technology