28 Characteristics of the hand in Fragile X syndrome (Xq27).

How to recognize the hand in Fragile X syndrome?

Alexander Rodewald presented in 1986 the very first ‘phantom picture’ describing the typical hand characteristics in Fragile X syndrome (e.g. including the simian crease or Sydney line). But more detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were never presented after the A. Rodewald et al. (1986) publication. However, this month (february 2010) an updated ‘phantom picture’ has become available – featuring 28 characteristics of the hand in Fragile X syndrome (+ a couple of other hand related characteristics).

What are typical hand characteristics in Fragile X syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of a Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the fingerprints of the 3rd finger (and the 2nd + 4th finger); often these demonstrate the presence of ‘radial loop’ patterns and/or arch patterns (the normal ‘ulnar loop’ patterns are less common in Fragile X syndrome) – combined with a ‘transverse’ pattern in the palmar ridge lines in the distal palmar zone.

HAND SHAPE:
The palm width (hand breadth) is relatively broad, and the palm length is usually a bit short. Finger length is relatively long compared to the palm length, but slightly short compared to the palm breadth.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Fragile X syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in most cases of Fragile X syndrome certain combinations of the 28 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

More details available at:
How to use the ‘simian crease’ for recognizing Fragile X syndrome?

Photo: the hand of a baby hand with hyperextensible finger joints – often seen in Fragile X syndrome.
Hand of a baby hand with hyperextensible finger joints - often seen in fragile x syndrome.

Is the 2D:4D finger ratio the new chiromancy?

Is the 2D:4D finger ratio the new chiromancy?

Palmistry’s digital analogue: is 2D:4D finger ratio the new Chiromancy?

Chris McManus – author of the book: ‘Right Hand, Left Hand‘ – considers claims that finger-length ratios point to individual and sex differences.

Will measuring finger length ratios become the new Chiromancy? The famous palmist Cheiro would likely have loved John Manning’s ‘The Finger Book’!

Chiromancy (cheiromancy), the notorious pseudoscience that Sir Walter Scott bracketed with physiognomy, astrology and “other fantastic arts of prediction”, has for two decades been creeping back into scientific favour. And UK professor of Psychology John T. Manning appears to be its high priest.

Nevertheless, Chris McManus points out in his article that there are a few problems in John Manning’s digit ratio work. Manning’s theory generates a strong sense of deja vu, for so much is reminiscent of the rambling, sprawling, all-encompassing theory of almost all things neuropsychological, and indeed much beyond, put forward in the late 1980s. Read the rest of Chris McManus review of the finger length research:

Palmistry’s digital analogue: is 2D:4D finger ratio the new Chiromancy?
More digit ratio and finger length news

Fingers of fate - 2D:4D ratio: how the measure the length of the index finger + ring finger?

Finger length of London stock traders relates to financial success.

The finger length of London stock traders relates to financial success.

Low index finger vs. ring finger ratio relates to financial success

Researchers at the University of Cambridge found that stock traders with a lower digit ratio of 0.93, on average, earned 10 times more than those with an average ratio of 0.988.

Traders with a lower digit ratio made an average of 679,680 pounds (or about $1 million U.S.), compared with 61,320 pounds ($90,956 U.S.) by those with a higher ratio, the report said.

The research, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), found that individuals who were exposed to high levels of prenatal testosterone tended to be more profitable traders.

The British researchers provide the following explanation for their finger length research results:

Testosterone, a steroid hormone, surges between the 9th and 18th week of gestation, exerting powerful organizing effects on the developing body and brain. According to both animal and human studies, these effects may include increased confidence, risk-preferences and search persistence, as well as heightened vigilance and quickened reaction times.

The amount of testosterone one was exposed to in the womb can be measured because it leaves traces throughout the adult body. Measures of prenatal androgens are increasingly used by paediatricians to gauge whether a newborn has been exposed to abnormal levels of steroid. The most common measure for behavioural studies is the ratio of the index to ring finger (2D:4D) on the right hand, a relatively longer ring finger – lower 2D:4D – indicating higher prenatal testosterone levels. Males typically have ratios below 1, women above 1.

As digit ratios have been found to predict performance in competitive sports such as tennis, football, and skiing, the scientists hypothesised that 2D:4D may also influence the risk preferences and physical speed required for what is variously called noise or high-frequency. Traders engaged in high frequency trading look for fleeting price anomalies and hold their trades for minutes, sometimes mere seconds.

Finger length in London stock traders.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE & RELATED RESEARCH:
Index finger & ring finger length related to financial success!
Lingerie sharpens the financial mind
More finger length & digit ratio research
The finger book