9 LINES & 9 DISORDERS:
WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

In order to avoid misunderstandings, a brief description of each of the 9 hand lines in the picture, is given below:

Line 1 = extra crease on the distal phalange (beyond the distal interphalangeal crease)
Line 2 = extra crease on the middle phalange (in 1 or more fingers)
Line 3 = single crease on the pinky finger
Line 4 = extra crease on the thumb
Line 5 = ‘hockey-stick crease’
Line 6 = simian crease
Line 7 = Sydney crease
Line 8 = transverse hypothenar crease
Line 9 = secondary creases: unusually high density

The names of the 9 disorders are:

A = Alagille syndrome (= genetic disorder related to e.g. the liver, heart & kidney)
B = Coffin-Lowry syndrome (= genetic disorder: e.g. mental problems, health)
C = Down syndrome (= genetic disorder: trisomy 21, e.g. mental handicap, health)
F = Edward syndrome (= genetic disorder: trisomy 18, e.g. low rate of survival)
D = Fetal alcohol syndrome (= caused by alcohol abuse during pregnancy)
E = Fragile-X syndrome (= genetic disorder: Xq27, e.g. mental handicap, autism)
G = Pit-Rogers-Dank syndrome (= e.g. growth disorder, mental retardation)
H = Schizophrenia (= psychiatric disorder)
I = Sickle Cell Diseases (= blood disorder)

The QUIZ-task is very simple:
‘Which line (in the picture above) belongs to which disorder?’

(You can submit your answers as a response to this blog post, but you can also discuss the details at the Modern Hand Reading Forum, at:   The ‘Weird-Hand-Lines QUIZ’ – part 2)

By the way, quite a few ”clues’ for finding the right connections are provided in the section MEDICAL HAND ANALYSIS.

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How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome - 27 characteristics.

How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome?

Lionel Sharples Penrose introduced in 1963 in the magazine Nature the first ‘phantom picture’ for the hand in Down syndrome. The picture described some of the typical characteristics of the hand in Down syndrome – including the ‘simian crease’. Later more detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were presented by Schaumann & Alter (1976), and Rodewald (1981).

In januari 2010 a more detailed version became available – describing 27 characteristics of the hand in Down’s syndrome!

What are the most typical hand characteristics in Down’s syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of another unusual hand line: the Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the hypothenar zone of the hand (in palmistry a.k.a. ‘mount of moon’); usually this zone a large ‘ulnar loop’ pattern combined with a high positioned palmar axial triradius.

HAND SHAPE:
Short fingers (thumb and pinky finger are often abnormally short) + a square shaped palm.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Down syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in all cases of Down syndrome certain combinations of the 27 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

A presentation of all details is available at:
How to use the simian line + 26 other characteristics as a hand marker in Down’s syndrome!

Photo: example of the hand in a Down syndrome baby

Example of a baby hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

The simian line is often found in Down syndrome, but also frequently seen in Asian populations.

The simian line is often found in Down syndrome, but also frequently seen in Asian populations.

The simian line

The simian line is a ‘notorious’ hand crease and well-known for it’s significance in Down’s syndrome – more than half of these people have a simian line in 1 or both hands, while only about 1% of healthy populations have a simian line. Nevertheless, this line is also frequently observed in the hands of certain ethnic population – especially in Asians!

In 1866, R.L. Down discovered in 1906 the relationship between the simian crease and Down’s syndrome. The simian line is also know as: the ‘simian crease’ or ‘single palmar transverse crease’.

‘Healthy hands’ with the simian line usually do not have the other stereotypical hand features related related to Down syndrome are missing (examples of other Down syndrome-related hand features are: a short thumb, curved little finger, certain dermatoglyphic patterns in the palm and fingerprints).

In some (Asian) populations is extraordinary frequently seen, such as: Pygmies: 34.7 %; Gypsies: 14.3 %; Chinese: 13.0 %; Koreans: 11.2 % – more percentages are presented in the full article.

Deciphering the simian line.

READ FURTHER ABOUT THE SIMIAN LINE:
The simian line: a notorious hand crease
The simian line: merging of mind and heart
The simian crease, down syndrome & other disorders
Do you have a simian line?



Leeds
Harrison Richards - Palm reader in Leeds
Harrison
Richards

Palm reader Harrison Richards reads palms in Leeds

Expertises:
Contemporary palmistry.

FULL PROFILE:
Palm reader Harrison Richards

Harrison Richard's website

At his website Palm-reading.co.uk Harrison Richards Harrison Richards describes how he has read the minds, palms and cards of thousands of people around the world, both in person and on national television. Harrison Richards appears to have pulled the ancient art of palm reading kicking and screaming into the 21st Century!

RELATED PALM READING:
Palm readers in UK
Hand reading in Europe
Do you have a simian line?

Hands on health

Do you have a simian line?

November 2, 2008

The simian line.

The simian line.

A simian line variant.

A simian line variant.

A simian crease variant.

A simian crease variant.

A single transverse crease variant.

A single transverse crease variant.

A perfect simian line!

A perfect simian line!

The simian line

The simian line has been well-known since R.L. Down discovered in 1906 it’s significance in Down syndrome – it was his father who actually discovered the Down syndrome in 1866. Since then the simian line has been studied in many other aspects of life. The full article presents an overview of the most relevant aspects of the simian line.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE A SIMIAN LINE?

A typical ‘simian line’ is characterized by the presence of a single line that runs across the palm of the hand. People normally have three major hand creases in their palms. Only when the simian line is present there are only two major creases. By the way, the simian line can manifest in various line constellations in the palm: some examples are present at the left.

SIMIAN LINE SYNONYMS

The most popular alternative names for the ‘simian line’ are:

  • simian crease
  • single palmar transverse crease
  • simian fold
  • WHAT DOES A SIMIAN LINE MEAN?

    The simian line appears to be related to rich scala of medical problems. Wrongdiagnosis.com presents a list of 93 causes of the simian crease, including Down syndrome, fragile-x syndrome and the cat-cry syndrome. However, one should never forget that the simian line (simian crease) is also found in the hands of perfectly healthy people!

    FULL ARTICLE:
    The simian line: a notorious hand crease!

    MORE HAND NEWS:
    HANDS IN THE NEWS

    13 Gift markings in your hands

    13 Gift markings in your hands

    3 Gift markers in your hands

    3 Gift markers in your hands

    How to recognize ‘gift markings’ in your hands?

    At the International Institute of Hand Analysis (IIHA) a system of ‘talent markers’ in the hand is developed – they call the system: ‘gift markings’, or ‘gift markers’. Some of these interesting hand-signs are:

    * Gift marker 1. The Jupiter star (see point ‘1’ in the UPPER picture)

    SUPER TALENT: Leadership, super achiever | SHADOW SIDE: president’s wife syndrome

    * Gift marker 10. Medical sitgmata (see point ’10’ in UPPER picture)

    SUPER TALENT: gifted healer, personal growth consultant | SHADOW SIDE: intimacy breakdown

    * Gift marking 15. The Simian line (see point ’15’ in the LOWER picture)

    SUPER TALENT: intensity of focus | SHADOW SIDE: feeling misunderstood

    The full article includes a full list of the 16 ‘Gift markers’ + a summary of interesting comments on these presented by the expert Hand Analysts: Pamelah Landers, Jena Griffiths, Peggie Arvidson and Baeth Davis.

    FULL ARTICLE:
    Gift markings in your hands