9 LINES & 9 DISORDERS:
WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

In order to avoid misunderstandings, a brief description of each of the 9 hand lines in the picture, is given below:

Line 1 = extra crease on the distal phalange (beyond the distal interphalangeal crease)
Line 2 = extra crease on the middle phalange (in 1 or more fingers)
Line 3 = single crease on the pinky finger
Line 4 = extra crease on the thumb
Line 5 = ‘hockey-stick crease’
Line 6 = simian crease
Line 7 = Sydney crease
Line 8 = transverse hypothenar crease
Line 9 = secondary creases: unusually high density

The names of the 9 disorders are:

A = Alagille syndrome (= genetic disorder related to e.g. the liver, heart & kidney)
B = Coffin-Lowry syndrome (= genetic disorder: e.g. mental problems, health)
C = Down syndrome (= genetic disorder: trisomy 21, e.g. mental handicap, health)
F = Edward syndrome (= genetic disorder: trisomy 18, e.g. low rate of survival)
D = Fetal alcohol syndrome (= caused by alcohol abuse during pregnancy)
E = Fragile-X syndrome (= genetic disorder: Xq27, e.g. mental handicap, autism)
G = Pit-Rogers-Dank syndrome (= e.g. growth disorder, mental retardation)
H = Schizophrenia (= psychiatric disorder)
I = Sickle Cell Diseases (= blood disorder)

The QUIZ-task is very simple:
‘Which line (in the picture above) belongs to which disorder?’

(You can submit your answers as a response to this blog post, but you can also discuss the details at the Modern Hand Reading Forum, at:   The ‘Weird-Hand-Lines QUIZ’ – part 2)

By the way, quite a few ”clues’ for finding the right connections are provided in the section MEDICAL HAND ANALYSIS.

How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome - 27 characteristics.

How to recognize the hand in Down syndrome?

Lionel Sharples Penrose introduced in 1963 in the magazine Nature the first ‘phantom picture’ for the hand in Down syndrome. The picture described some of the typical characteristics of the hand in Down syndrome – including the ‘simian crease’. Later more detailed ‘phantom pictures’ were presented by Schaumann & Alter (1976), and Rodewald (1981).

In januari 2010 a more detailed version became available – describing 27 characteristics of the hand in Down’s syndrome!

What are the most typical hand characteristics in Down’s syndrome?

HAND LINES:
A common characteristic is the presence of the famous ‘simian line‘; an alternative is the presence of another unusual hand line: the Sydney line.

DERMATOGLYPHICS:
Here one should especially notice the hypothenar zone of the hand (in palmistry a.k.a. ‘mount of moon’); usually this zone a large ‘ulnar loop’ pattern combined with a high positioned palmar axial triradius.

HAND SHAPE:
Short fingers (thumb and pinky finger are often abnormally short) + a square shaped palm.

NOTICE: The author of the new ‘phantom picture’ for Down syndrome described a specific guideline which states that in all cases of Down syndrome certain combinations of the 27 characteristics are found in both the fingers AND the palm of the hand!

A presentation of all details is available at:
How to use the simian line + 26 other characteristics as a hand marker in Down’s syndrome!

Photo: example of the hand in a Down syndrome baby

Example of a baby hand in Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

The Sydney line: an underestimated hand mark.

The Sydney line: an underestimated hand mark.

The Sydney line: an underestimated hand mark in Palmistry!

Many years ago the Sydney line was discovered as another hand line mark for Down’s syndrome – the other handmark is the ‘famous’ simian crease. How come that the diagnostic significance of the Sydney line is still underestimated?

This article describes an overview of the global palmistry- & scientific research related to the Sydney line.

In 1967 a Belgian study on Down’s syndrome was published which pointed out that besides the ‘famous’ simian line, an ‘extended proximal palmar crease’ is also a significant feature in Down’s syndrome.

One year later some researchers from Sydney, Australia (Purvis-Smith & Menser, 1968) reported that this fascinating palmar line is also frequently found in the hands of patients with congenital rubella – from that point researchers adopted the name used by researchers from Sydney: the name of the ‘Sydney line’ was established!

S.G. Purvis-Smith (Australian researcher) described the Sydney line as follows:

“A sydney line occurs where the proximal transverse crease extends beyond the midline axis of the fifth finger towards the ulnar border of the palm.”

Dozens of studies have confirmed the diagnostic significance of the Sydney line – sometimes the discriminative value is even higher compared to the simian crease! The significance of the Sydney line can be related to various medical problems (such as: Down’s syndrome, leukemia, Alzheimer dementia), and psychological problems (in general: developmental problems at young ages).

You can read more about the Sydney line & the simian crease in these extended articles:

The Sydney line: an underestimated hand mark
The simian line: a ‘notorious’ hand crease
More hand analysis news

The Sydney line: a hand mark for Down's syndrome, leukemia, Alzheimer dementia, and psychological problems.

Hand analysis: hands & science.

Scientific hand analysis mini-course:
palmistry course on the basis of scientific facts!

A 33 pages hand analysis course about how diseases, syndromes and psychological problems manifest in the features of the human hand.

What can you expect from this online mini-course ‘Scientific Hand Analysis’? – A unique palmistry course:

MEDICAL HANDANALYSIS:

Why is Down’s syndrome often featured with a ‘simian crease‘ or a Sydney line? About diseases, syndromes and hand characteristics.

PSYCHIATRY & HAND ANALYSIS:

What are common hand features in schizophrenia? About the link between the brain, dermatoglyphics, and other hand features.

PSYCHOLOGY & HANDANALYSIS:

About hand features that related to developmental problems, personality characteristics, and low intelligence.

Palm reading: scientific hand analysis course.

OTHER RELATED SUGGESTIONS:
Scientific palmistry course
Males and females: the major hand differences
Handanalyse.startpagina.nl: Dutch palmistry search page
Medical palm reading: about the nails, dermatoglyphics, palmar lines and the fingers