God Given Glyphs - A new book about Five Elemental Chirology!

God Given Glyphs!

What is 5 Element Chirology?

Chirologist Jennifer Hirsch – founder of the Chirology Center of South Africa – presented last year her self-published book – titled: ‘God Given Glyphs’. An authentic pioneering book in the field of hand reading, which has been recognized by fellow (elemental) chirologers as a new milestone in the history of chirology!

An authentic, dedicated book about modern hand reading, featured with a beautiful 3-dimensional cover.

Jennifer Hirsch positions ‘Five Elemental Chirology’ follows:

“The term ‘chirology’ describes the collective global body – both ancient and modern – of all facets of the knowledge and study of the forms and markings of the human hand. Consequently, there exist today various other Wester and Eastern systems of chirological hand analysis, including traditional European palmistry.”

The unique character of ‘Five Element Chirology’ lies in the origins of ancient Buddhism. The Buddhistic philosophy describes how “the principle of graduated materiality” manifests through the four elements ‘earth’, ‘water’, ‘fire’, and ‘air’ are graduates from the fifth element ‘chi’. Where ‘chi’ represents the highest teachings of love, compassion and foregiveness.

‘Five Element Chirology’ describes how the five Buddhistic elements can be studied through the shape and features of the hands.

READ FURTHER ABOUT OTHER ASPECTS OF CHIROLOGY:
Chirology & Hand Reading in South-Africa
Chirology news, research & psychology
Cheirology & Hand Reading in Africa
Psychodiagnostic Chirology

In ‘Five Element Chirology’ each finger relates to one of the 5 Buddhistic elements.
The hand, the fingers & the 5 Buddhistic elements.

Advertisements
DERMATOGLYPHICS: An introduction to the dermatoglyphs of the human hand.

Dermatoglyphics – News, reports & research!

The word ‘dermatoglyphics‘ was introduced in 1926 by Harold Cummins – the word refers directly to the study of the patterns & characteristics of the skin ridges in the human hand (and foot). What are the basic characteristics of the dermatoglyphics in the human hand?

FINGERPRINT DERMATOGLYPHICS:

In most populations around the world is the ‘ulnar loop’ the most observed fingerprint pattern (see: the fingerprint of the pinky finger in the picture above). Loops are most frequently found on the little finger (and middle finger); loops are least frequently found on the pointer finger.
In some Asian populations the ‘whorl’ (see: the fingerprint of the ring finger in the picture above) is more common than the ‘ulnar loop’. Whorls are more often seen on the thumb and ring finger.
In population research usually the pointer finger demonstrates more variation than the the other fingers. For example the most common ‘ulnar loop’ is least often seen on the pointer finger, which often exhibits an other pattern such as: the ‘arch’, ‘tented arch’, ‘whorl’ or ‘radial loop’ (see: the pointer finger in the picture above).

PALMAR DERMATOGLYPHICS:

The variations in the dermatoglyphics of the handpalm are much more complex than the variations in the fingerprints. An important element concerns the presence of the ‘palmar triradii’ (see: a, b, c, d, and t in the picture above): normally each finger is featured with a palmar triradius – triradius t belongs to the thumb (the thumb mouse – a.k.a. as the ‘thenar’, or in palmistry: ‘mount of Venus’ could be recognized as the third phalange of the thumb).
However, the number of palmar triradii varies with the presence of palmar ‘loops’ (or: palmar ‘whorls’). Usually the link between the number of fingers (D = digits), palmar triradii (T) and palmar loops (L) can be described with the following formula, which is known as the Penrose topological formula (Lionel Penrose, 1965):

T = L + D – 1

More details available via:
The function of the fingerprints & dermatoglyphics in the human hand!

Picture: example of the most common patterns in the dermatoglypics of the palm and fingers.

[NOTICE: The picture below includes a small mistake: the hand palm usually has 1 single palmar ‘loop’ featured with 5 palmar triradii – this implicate that ‘c-line’ (which starts in the triradius below the ring finger) should have ended between the pinky finger and the end of the heart line – and not between the ring finger and middle finger as indicated by the picture]

Palmar & fingerprint dermatoglyphics.

Hand analysis: hands & science.

Scientific hand analysis mini-course:
palmistry course on the basis of scientific facts!

A 33 pages hand analysis course about how diseases, syndromes and psychological problems manifest in the features of the human hand.

What can you expect from this online mini-course ‘Scientific Hand Analysis’? – A unique palmistry course:

MEDICAL HANDANALYSIS:

Why is Down’s syndrome often featured with a ‘simian crease‘ or a Sydney line? About diseases, syndromes and hand characteristics.

PSYCHIATRY & HAND ANALYSIS:

What are common hand features in schizophrenia? About the link between the brain, dermatoglyphics, and other hand features.

PSYCHOLOGY & HANDANALYSIS:

About hand features that related to developmental problems, personality characteristics, and low intelligence.

Palm reading: scientific hand analysis course.

OTHER RELATED SUGGESTIONS:
Scientific palmistry course
Males and females: the major hand differences
Handanalyse.startpagina.nl: Dutch palmistry search page
Medical palm reading: about the nails, dermatoglyphics, palmar lines and the fingers

The hand.

Psychology Research

In 1998 neurologist Frank R. Wilson published a book titled: “The hand: how its use shapes the brain, language, and human culture”. The book was written into the premise that the hand is as much at the core of human life as the brain itself.

The human hand appears to be a miracle of biomechanics, one of the most remarkable adaptions in the history of evolution. The hands of a concert pianist can elicit glorious sound and stir emotion; those of a surgeon can perform the most delicate operations; those of a rock climber allow him to scale a vertical mountain wall.

In his book Wilson makes the striking claim that it is because of the unique structure of the hand and its evolution in cooperation with the brain that Homo sapiens became the most intelligent, preeminent animal on the earth. And the thumb – Wilson dedicated a full chapter to what he calls the ‘The Twenty Four Karate Thumb’ – played a major role in the evolution of human kind.

The french sculptor César Baldaccini must have had likewise associations while making his famous sculpture ‘The Thumb’ (Le Pouce) – first presented in 1965 in Paris, today you can see it (in bronze or marble) in museums and public places all over the world – see the pictures below.

César & his 'thumb'.The Thumb.

PSYCHOLOGY RESEARCH & THE HUMAN HAND:

The following research programs focuss on important themes in modern psychology, which are being related to various aspect of the human hand:

  • Hand features related to Autism
  • Hand features related to Neuroticism
  • Left handed & leftward hand asymmetry
  • The top 10 hand gestures you’d better get right


  • Boulder
    Myrna Lou Goldbaum - Palmistry & Soul mate specialist
    Myrna Lou Goldbaum

    Palmist Myrna Lou Goldbaum reads hands in Boulder, Colorado (USA)

    Expertises:
    Palmist – Palmistry Author – Psychic Entertainer, Facilitator, Speaker & Teacher

    FULL PROFILE:
    Palmist Myrna Lou Goldbaum

    Myrna Lou Goldbaum Palmistry booth

    Myrna Lou Goldbaum writes about palmistry on her website some ‘Palmistry Facts’:

    “HANDS ARE THE MIRRORS OF THE SOUL”

    “In palmistry one learns to harness the unlimited powers of insight, creativity and spirituality. It allows changing mindset to make emotions, positive and negative, work. Palmistry can answer all “your” individual questions by unlocking the secrets. Discover your hidden talents and abilities.

    THE FIVE BASIC LINES ON A HUMAN HAND

    1. Life Line (birth, health, longevity)
    2. Love Line (soul mate connections, engagements, marriage)
    3. Work Line (employment opportunities, ability)
    4. Reproduction (possibilities in birth)
    5. Bracelets (timelines and how one handles life)”

    Palmistry - the length of the life line

    Palmistry - the length of the life line

    “Mr. Palmist, what’s the meaning of the length of the ‘life line’?”

    The life line is one of the most well-known features of Palmistry. Most people are able to find the life line in their own hands.

    PALMISTRY COURSE:
    Palmistry: discoveries about the human hand

    Some guidelines from the international Palmistry literature about the ‘life line’ (or ‘line of life’):

    William G. Benham writes in ‘The Benham Book of Palmistry’ (1900):

    (p. 467): “The line of Life indicates the health of the subject during the various periods of life, his physical strength in general, and whether he lives during each period on his nervous force or relies upon muscular robustness. By reason of these facts, it records many detailed events in his life, and forms a basis to fall back upon when seeking confirmations and explanations of indications found elsewhere in the hand.”

    Edward D. Campbell writes in ‘The Encyclopedia of Palmistry’ (1996):

    (p.133): “To the Indian palmists, this line reflects the strength of the family tree. Long, clear, and well-marked life lines are indicative of strength, vitality, good immune systems, good recovery ability, resilience, and sexual energy, especially if they describe a generous curve around a healthy mount of Venus.”

    Arnold Holtzman, Ph.D. writes in ‘Psychodiagnostic Chirology in Analysis and Therapy’ (2004):

    (p.116): “The tenar line: ego drive discipline. This line is identified almost universally as the line of life. And while tradition and folklore have their place in any culture this very unfortunate labeling has contributed to countless tragedies over the years. Books have been published in which the assertion was made that the length of this line is an indicator of the length of the person’s life, and many a death can be attributed to a palmist’s stated certainty that the subject would not life beyond a given year. It is imperative, then, to establish at the start that there is no link whatsoever between this line and the length of one’s life.”

    LEARN MORE ABOUT PALMISTRY:
    MEDICAL PALMISTRY | SCIENTIFIC PALMISTRY
    FINGERPRINT PALMISTRY | PALMISTRY & YOUR

    Palmistry psychology

    Palmistry - which hand to read?

    Palmistry - which hand to read?

    ‘Mr. Palmist, which hand do you read?’

    Which hand does the palmist read? History shows that the answer might depend on the culture where Palmistry is being used.

    PALMISTRY COURSE:
    Palmistry: discover the human hand

    Some recommendations from the international Palmistry literature on which hand to use for Palmistry:William G. Benham writes in ‘The Benham Book of Palmistry’ (1900):

    (p. 31): “In all examinations you should consult both hands, and should never attempt specific statements, unless they are based upon a thorough knowledge of the information which can be gleaned only from the hands considered seperately, and then together. Many failures are recorded in palm readings when one hand only has been used, due to the fact that men change as they grow older, and these changes are recorded in the right hand.”

    Edward D. Campbell writes in ‘The Encyclopedia of Palmistry’ (1996):

    (p.20): “I no longer follow any traditional method of looking at the right and left hand. I believe that those Eastern methods that look only to the right hand for male clients and the left hand for females are totally inadequate and sexist, and often are value-based against the left hand. This bias against the left hand has crept into Western Palmistry just as the latin word for left, sinister, has coloured our thoughts concerning left-handed persons as conniving, bad people.”

    Arnold Holtzman, Ph.D. writes in ‘Psychodiagnostic Chirology in Analysis and Therapy’ (2004):

    (p.63): “As for the hands themselves, no two are exactly alike – not even when they belong to the same person. The question that arises must be: if each hand is unique, delivering a ‘story’ which must, in some way, be different from every other ‘story’, which hand and which ‘story’ is the most representative of the individual? Which may we assume to be the truest mirror of his, or her, immediate circumstances? The answer is both – equally. Each hand may put forward its own account of the man it speaks of, and each would be entirely relevant.”

    LEARN MORE ABOUT PALMISTRY:
    MEDICAL PALMISTRY | SCIENTIFIC PALMISTRY | PALMISTRY & THE SEXES
    FINGERPRINTS & PALMISTRY | FINGERNAILS & PALMISTRY

    Palmistry psychology