DERMATOGLYPHICS: An introduction to the dermatoglyphs of the human hand.

Dermatoglyphics – News, reports & research!

The word ‘dermatoglyphics‘ was introduced in 1926 by Harold Cummins – the word refers directly to the study of the patterns & characteristics of the skin ridges in the human hand (and foot). What are the basic characteristics of the dermatoglyphics in the human hand?

FINGERPRINT DERMATOGLYPHICS:

In most populations around the world is the ‘ulnar loop’ the most observed fingerprint pattern (see: the fingerprint of the pinky finger in the picture above). Loops are most frequently found on the little finger (and middle finger); loops are least frequently found on the pointer finger.
In some Asian populations the ‘whorl’ (see: the fingerprint of the ring finger in the picture above) is more common than the ‘ulnar loop’. Whorls are more often seen on the thumb and ring finger.
In population research usually the pointer finger demonstrates more variation than the the other fingers. For example the most common ‘ulnar loop’ is least often seen on the pointer finger, which often exhibits an other pattern such as: the ‘arch’, ‘tented arch’, ‘whorl’ or ‘radial loop’ (see: the pointer finger in the picture above).

PALMAR DERMATOGLYPHICS:

The variations in the dermatoglyphics of the handpalm are much more complex than the variations in the fingerprints. An important element concerns the presence of the ‘palmar triradii’ (see: a, b, c, d, and t in the picture above): normally each finger is featured with a palmar triradius – triradius t belongs to the thumb (the thumb mouse – a.k.a. as the ‘thenar’, or in palmistry: ‘mount of Venus’ could be recognized as the third phalange of the thumb).
However, the number of palmar triradii varies with the presence of palmar ‘loops’ (or: palmar ‘whorls’). Usually the link between the number of fingers (D = digits), palmar triradii (T) and palmar loops (L) can be described with the following formula, which is known as the Penrose topological formula (Lionel Penrose, 1965):

T = L + D – 1

More details available via:
The function of the fingerprints & dermatoglyphics in the human hand!

Picture: example of the most common patterns in the dermatoglypics of the palm and fingers.

[NOTICE: The picture below includes a small mistake: the hand palm usually has 1 single palmar ‘loop’ featured with 5 palmar triradii – this implicate that ‘c-line’ (which starts in the triradius below the ring finger) should have ended between the pinky finger and the end of the heart line – and not between the ring finger and middle finger as indicated by the picture]

Palmar & fingerprint dermatoglyphics.

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Fingerprints provide finger grip + a touch-filter.

Fingerprints provide finger-grip + a touch-filter.

The function of fingerprints: ‘finger grip’ + ‘touch filter’:

Many palmists & hand analysts including the fingerprints in a hand reading. But what is the basic function of our fingerprints really?

Researchers from Paris (France) have recently presented new evidence that your fingerprints not only provide ‘finger-grip’, but the ridges also function as a filter for the human touch!

The word ‘fingerprints’ refers to the impressions made by the skin ridges on the fingers & thumbs – by the way: palms can leave the same impressions: ‘palmprints‘.

The major function of these skin ridges is to provide ‘friction’, or ‘traction’, when we grasp objects in daily life. And as a consequence because of the presence of skin ridges on our fingers & palms, objects held in our hands do not slip through our fingers.

For many years scientists believed that the fingerprints (skin ridges) have a second function: the enhancement of our sense of touch. But untill recentely there was hardly any hard evidence for this assumption. But times have changed since january 2009: French physicists at the ‘École Normale Supérieure‘ in Paris have presented new research. They found that the skin ridges (fingerprints) also amplify / filter vibrations triggered when our fingertips brush across an uneven surface. These processes help transmiting the signals of ‘touch’ to deeply embedded nerves involved in fine texture perception.

Some facts reported by the French fingerprint research:

• The researchers report that certain vibrations from the patterned fingertip are 100 times stronger than those from the smooth fingertip.

• The distinctiveness of fingerprint patterns from one person to the next does NOT(!) seem to have an effect on filtering capabilities – so regarding the sensitivity for ‘finger-touch’ it hardly makes any difference what type of fingerprints you have!

• The research was done with an ‘artificial fingertip’ – the first ever presented in the world!

Fingertips & fingerprints.

READ FURTHER ABOUT RELATED FINGERPRINT TOPICS:
Fingerprints provide ‘finger-grip’ + a ‘touch-filter’
News about fingers & fingerprints
The history of fingerprints & dermatoglyphics
How the pinky finger relates to autism
Articles about What your finger length may reveal